Alcohol. Alright?- Reducing alcohol related harm among young people

Alcohol. Alright? is an alcohol early intervention, engagement and behaviour change project. Objectives include helping young people rethink their alcohol consumption and related behaviour; improving knowledge about the potential harmful consequences of alcohol and enabling young people to reduce or stop their drinking and other related risk behaviours.

With our ready to go package we can train staff and provide a range of resources, including a digital app.

"There is evidence to show that Alcohol. Alright? encouraged young people to assess or rethink their drinking behaviour. Risks and experiences were explored and talked about openly with youth workers and other practitioners. Young people report intended and actual changes to their drinking behaviour. The resources have helped to improve young peoples understanding of the risks and health considerations of drinking and how to keep safe. The intervention activity logs show that 99 percent of the participants rated the intervention ‘very helpful’ or ‘helpful’”. (The Alcohol. Alright? evaluation report. July 2013).

A range of user-friendly materials enables staff to engage with and provide advice to young people. Alongside the resources, frontline practitioners receive training, which increases their confidence and competence to deliver the intervention. Young people play a key role in the development of the intervention.

The objectives of Alcohol. Alright?:

  • To help young people rethink their alcohol consumption and related behaviour
  • To improve knowledge about the potential harmful consequences of alcohol use amongst young people
  • To enable young people to reduce or stop their drinking and other related risk behaviours
  • To signpost young people to sources of further help and advice

Alcohol. Alright? is based on five key principles:

  1. Practitioners through their everyday contact with young people have a key role in promoting and protecting the health. Brief interventions provide an effective way of using such contact.
  2. The evidence indicates that brief interventions can be effective at reducing excessive drinking and alcohol-related risk in young drinkers.
  3. The approach should include motivational interviewing methods and the provision of personalised feedback delivered in an engaging and friendly style.
  4. The intervention adheres to the latest official advice on the consumption of alcohol by children and young people.
  5. Practitioners follow established policies and pathways described in local safeguarding guidance.

Download 'Alcohol Alright?' sample quiz

 Download 'Alcohol Alright?' sample leaflet

Downloads and resources section


 

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